International Relations in Southeast Asia

Featured Books

* The Making of Southeast Asia: International Relations of a Region
* Southeast Asia in the New International Era
* EU-ASEAN Relations in the 21st Century: Strategic Partnership in the Making
* International Relations in Southeast Asia: Between Bilateralism and Multilateralism
* Japan’s Relations with Southeast Asia: The Fukuda Doctrine and Beyond

The Making of Southeast Asia: International Relations of a Region

The Making of Southeast Asia: International Relations of a Region

by Amitav Acharya
Cornell Studies in Political Economy, 2013

Developing a framework to study “what makes a region,” Amitav Acharya investigates the origins and evolution of Southeast Asian regionalism and international relations. He views the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) “from the bottom up”-as not only a U.S.-inspired ally in the Cold War struggle against communism but also an organization that reflects indigenous traditions. Although Acharya deploys the notion of “imagined community” to examine the changes, especially since the Cold War, in the significance of ASEAN dealings for a regional identity, he insists that “imagination” is itself not a neutral but rather a culturally variable concept. The regional imagination in Southeast Asia imagines a community of nations different from NAFTA or NATO, the OAU, or the European Union.

In this new edition of a book first published as The Quest for Identity in 2000, Acharya updates developments in the region through the first decade of the new century: the aftermath of the financial crisis of 1997, security affairs after September 2001, the long-term impact of the 2004 tsunami, and the substantial changes wrought by the rise of China as a regional and global actor. Acharya argues in this important book for the crucial importance of regionalism in a different part of the world.

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Southeast Asia in the New International Era

 Southeast Asia in the New International Era

by Robert A. Dayley and Clark D. Neher
Westview Press, 2013

Southeast Asia in the New International Era highlights the dramatic political events sweeping a dynamic region populated by more than 500 million people. Where economic boom and crisis dominated events in the late twentieth century, economic recovery and policy dilemmas define much of the region today. Political cleavage continues to bedevil Thailand’s intermittent democratization. Vietnam’s single-party rule fosters ever tighter political control as it reacts to lagging economic growth. Surprising many, Burma’s once closed polity now shows signs of genuine reform and openness. Elsewhere, patronage politics continues to inhibit development in the Philippines even as it fuels unprecedented growth in Cambodia and Laos. Home to the world’s largest Muslim population, Indonesia blazes new ground with young democratic institutions while simmering aspirations for greater democracy in neighboring Malaysia generate mass protest. Representing the greatest contrast in the region is the rich and stable, corporatist state of Singapore versus the economically poor and politically fragile democracy of Timor-Leste. Amidst domestic developments, ASEAN’s global profile continues to rise as the region’s governments address a growing array of transnational concerns. This newly revised edition examines these developments and many others affecting the region and international political economy.

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EU-ASEAN Relations in the 21st Century: Strategic Partnership in the Making 

EU-ASEAN Relations in the 21st Century: Strategic Partnership in the Making

edited by Clara Portela and Daniel Novotny
Palgrave Macmillan, 2012

The world-class range of academic and practitioner contributors explore the long-neglected and relatively unexplored theme of political relations between the EU and ASEAN in an attempt to escape the economic and security-centered approaches, prevalent in contemporary U.S. debate. In doing so they deal with a selection of topics from an inter-disciplinary perspective touching on different domains, such as security, comparative integration, human rights, energy, or the image of the EU. The four main themes examined are: ‘ASEAN and the EU Today’, ‘(Inter-)Regionalism in Danger?’, ‘Shifting Perceptions’, and ‘Can the EU be a Model for ASEAN?’. Bridging the gap between academic and practitioner, EU and ASEAN, this volume provides a rare forum for views on the nature of and possible future developments in the EU-ASEAN relations.

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International Relations in Southeast Asia: Between Bilateralism and Multilateralism 

International Relations in Southeast Asia: Between Bilateralism and Multilateralism

Edited by N Ganesan and Ramses Amer
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2010

“The volume edited by Ganesan and Amer is a welcome departure from the academic theoretical focus on the regionalist enterprise of ASEAN. As the aspirational goal of an ASEAN community becomes increasingly elusive – if not illusory – this book explains in real policy terms the challenge to the political efficacy of ASEAN’s multilateral fora, constrained as they are by consensus, non-interference, and fiercely defended state sovereignty. In detailed and sharply etched studies of the key bilateral interests and issues at the state level, the authors demonstrate that rather than recourse to the multilateral diplomatic platform represented by ASEAN, the preferred national mechanisms for the critical areas of cooperation and conflict will continue to be bilateral and the practies of traditional statecraft.” – Donald E. Weatherbee, Russell Distinguished Professor Emeritus, University of South Carolina

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Japan’s Relations with Southeast Asia: The Fukuda Doctrine and Beyond

Japan's Relations with Southeast Asia: The Fukuda Doctrine and Beyond

edited by Peng Er Lam
Routledge, 2012

The Fukuda Doctrine has been the official blueprint to Japan’s foreign policy towards Southeast Asia since 1977. This book examines the Fukuda Doctrine in the context of Japan-Southeast Asia relations, and discusses the possibility of a non-realist approach in the imagining and conduct of international relations in East Asia.

The collapse of 54 years of Liberal Democratic Party rule and the advent of a new Democratic Party of Japan raises the question of whether the Fukuda Doctrine is still relevant as a framework to analyse Tokyo’s policy and behaviour towards Southeast Asia. Looking at its origins and norms amidst three decades of change, the book argues that the Fukuda Doctrine is still relevant to Japan-Southeast Asian relations, and should be extended to relations between China and Japan if an East Asian Community is to be built. The book goes on to discuss the Fukuda Doctrine in relation to the power shift in Asia, including the revitalization of Japan’s security role.

By providing a detailed understanding of a non-western perspective of Japan’s relationship with Southeast Asia, this book is a useful contribution for students and scholars of Asian Studies, Politics and International Relations.

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