Manila

Featured Books

* Sundays in Manila
* Rubble and Redemption: Finding Life in the Slums of Manila
* The Manila We Knew
* Manila, My Manila: A History for the Young
* The Americanization of Manila 1898-1921

Sundays in Manila

Sundays in Manila

by Robert H. Boyer
University of the Phillipines Pr, 2013

“Bob Boyer offers affectionate-often intimate-portraits of Filipino life and culture, formed over many visits to a country that many, if not most, Americans know only in the broadest terms: as a staunch ally in the Pacific and its other wars, as the rack of Imelda’s shoes, and as the home of Manny Pacquiao. Bob sharpens that picture with factual detail. Whether he’s riding a jeepney, sipping iced tea at the Chocolate Kiss, exploring the mysteries of Quiapo, or marching up Bataan and Corregidor, Dr. Boyer invariably delights and inevitably instructs; sometimes-like all good teachers do, but ever so gently-Bob disturbs and critiques us with his observations. It’s hard to imagine how a visitor from the snowbound American Midwest could connect so well with sun-baked Pinoys, but Bob Boyer did-and does again, through this eminently enjoyable book.” –Jose Y. Dalisay, Jr., PhD, Professor, University of the Philippines Diliman. “I have not met Prof. Boyer. Yet, I feel that I know him quite well. His style of writing for Sundays in Manila is not only easy to read, it is also personal. During my four decades of travel to the Philippines I walked many of the paths Prof. Boyer writes about. The scenes are described so vividly and with such clarity that I feel I am at his side. The book also served as a learning experience for me. While I visited many of the same sites, the book describes them in so much additional detail that I now know the sites better. The Philippines is blessed by a number of historic sites as well as those associated with the American period and World War II. Professor Boyer serves both as a personal historian and a guide as he brings historic events to life. The book serves as an excellent reference for persons interested in Philippine history as well as for those who plan to visit the country.” –John A. Ballweg PhD, Professor Emeritus, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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Rubble and Redemption: Finding Life in the Slums of Manila

 Rubble and Redemption

by Christian and Christine Schneider
Piquant Editions, 2012

“No Europeans live there!” exclaim the locals when the Schneider family moves to the slums of Manila. Yet garbage dumps and tin shacks are to be their home for many years. It’s here that they encounter chief witness Nick, doomed Jessabel, rapist Arol, billionaire Doña, guerilla Nardo, burnt-out development worker Rob … The couple’s gripping, first-hand account tells of countless fascinating encounters, of friendship and betrayal, of floods and shoot-outs in broad daylight, of prayers, dreams and fears, of meaningless death and meaningful life. Christian Schneider, a trained nurse, and his wife, Christine, a primary school teacher, spent over nine years in the slums of Manila with their two children. Through their life with the poor, they helped develop therapeutic communities for former drug addicts, prostitutes and street children. Christian and Christine now live back in Switzerland, but continue to support the aid organization Onesimo they founded in Manila.

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The Manila We Knew 

The Manila We Knew

edited by Erlinda Enriquez Panlilio
Anvil Publishing, 2006

“This little volume is a valuable contribution to the lore that accumulates about every great city in the world– part social history, part myth, and part love song. Manila might be sinking under the weight of problems proclaimed every day by newspaper columnists and TV commentators. It might be plagued by calamities, both natural and manmade. It historical monuments might be wrecked by unthinking politicians; it walls and bridges defaced by ugly posters and graffiti; its hapless pedestrians killed by reckless drivers and ineptly constructed billboards. It will survive nonetheless, because people like the writers of this book will not give up on it. These Manilenas will stand their ground. Here is their testament to the city of their affections.” — From the Foreward by Cristina Pantoja Hidalgo

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Manila, My Manila: A History for the Young 

Manila, My Manila

by Nick Joaquín
Bookmark Publishing, 1999

A history of the Philippines written by a Manileño (a Philippine National Artist for Literature) from the point of view of a Manila resident. This book gives great insight into the city and how it came to evolve into what it is today.

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The Americanization of Manila 1898-1921

The Americanization of Manila 1898-1921

by Cristina Evangelista Torres
Clearway Logistics Phase 7-9, 2012

This book makes use of the historical descriptive method to describe the origins and evolution of the Americanization process in Manila in the first two decades of American rule. It seeks to describe the transformation of the city in the light of the American colonial objectives. It focuses on the sociopolitical dynamics of administrative policy on three important components of America social modernization program: city planning and infrastructure, health and sanitation, and education. The book adops an entirely different framework by examing colonization from the perspective of cross-cultural relations. It espouse an interdisciplinary approach and uses indigenous social science concepts as integrating mechanism. The author uses the concepts of indigenous concepts of loob and kapwa and Scott’s dominant -subordinate relationship as operation paradigms to analyze colonial relationships in a historical study. The various forms of interaction between Americans and the Filipinos are examined from records of both public and private discourse of Americans and Filipinos.

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