Protests & Resistance in SE Asia

Featured Books

* Challenging Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia: Comparing Indonesia and Malaysia
* Constructing A Security Community In Southeast Asia: Asean And The Problem Of Regional Order
* Genocide and Resistance in Southeast Asia: Documentation, Denial, and Justice in Cambodia and East Timor
* Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia
* The Return of the Galon King: History, Law, and Rebellion in Colonial Burma

Challenging Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia: Comparing Indonesia and Malaysia


edited by Ariel Heryanto, Sumit K. Mandal
Routledge, 2003

Challenging Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia is one of the first substantial comparative studies of contemporary Indonesia and Malaysia, homes to the world’s largest Muslim population. Following the collapse of New Order rule in Indonesia in 1998, this book provides an in-depth examination of anti-authoritarian forces in contemporary Indonesia and Malaysia, assessing their problems and prospects. The authors discuss the roles played by women, public intellectuals, arts workers, industrial workers as well as environmental and Islamic activists. They explore how different forms of authoritarianism in the two countries affect the prospects of democratization, and examine the impact and legacy of the diverse social and political protests in Indonesia and Malaysia in the late 1990s.

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Constructing A Security Community In Southeast Asia: Asean And The Problem Of Regional Order


by Amitav Acharya
Routledge, 2009

This second edition of Constructing a Security Community in Southeast Asia takes the excellent framework from Acharya’s first edition and brings it up-to-date, looking at ASEAN’s comprehensive and critical account of the evolution of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) norms and the viability of the ASEAN way of conflict management.

Key issues in determining the future stability of the Southeast Asian and Asia Pacific region are covered, including:

– intra-regional relations and the effect of membership expansion
– the ASEAN Regional Forum and East Asian regionalism
– ASEAN’s response to terrorism and other transnational challenges
– debates over ASEAN’s non-interference doctrine
– the ‘ASEAN Security Community’ and the ASEAN Charter
– the impact of the rise of China and India and ASEAN’s relations with the US and Japan.

The new edition will continue to appeal to students and scholars of Asian security, international relations theory and Southeast Asian studies as well as policymakers and the media.

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Genocide and Resistance in Southeast Asia: Documentation, Denial, and Justice in Cambodia and East Timor


by Ben Kiernan
Transaction Publishers, 2007

Two modern cases of genocide and extermination began In Southeast Asia in the same year. Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge regime ruled Cambodia from 1975 to 1979, and Indonesian forces occupied East Timor from 1975 to 1999. This book examines the horrific consequences of Cambodian communist revolution and Indonesian anti-communist counterinsurgency. It also chronicles the two cases of indigenous resistance to genocide and extermination, the international cover-ups that obstructed documentation of these crimes, and efforts to hold the perpetrators legally accountable.

The perpetrator regimes inflicted casualties in similar proportions. Each caused the deaths of about one-fifth of the population of the nation. Cambodia’s mortality was approximately 1.7 million, and approximately 170,000 perished in East Timor. In both cases, most of the deaths occurred in the five-year period from 1975 to 1980, In addition, Cambodia and East Timor not only shared the experience of genocide but also of civil war, international intervention, and UN conflict resolution. U.S. policymakers supported the invading Indonesians in Timor, as well as the indigenous Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. Both regimes exterminated ethnic minorities, including local Chinese, as well as political dissidents. Yet the ideological fuel that ignited each conflagration was quite different. Jakarta pursued anti-communism; the Khmer Rouge were communists. In East Timor the major Indonesian goal was conquest. In Cambodia, the Khmer Rouge’s goal was revolution. Maoist ideology influenced Pol Pot’s regime, but it also influenced the East Timorese resistance to Indonesia’s occupiers. Genocide and Resistance in Southeast Asia is significant both forits historical documentation and for its contribution to the study of the politics and mechanisms of genocide. It is a fundamental contribution that will be read by historians, human rights activists, and genocide studies specialists.

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Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia


by Vincent Boudreau
Cambridge University Press, 2009

Vince Boudreau compares strategies of repression and protest in post-war Burma, Indonesia and the Philippines because these alternative strategies shaped the social bases and opposition cultures available to dissidents and, in turn, influenced their effectiveness. He includes first-hand research as well as the the social movements’ literature to consider the interactions between the regimes in the wake of repression, and the subsequent emergence of democracy. Boudreau offers a genuinely comparative study of dictatorship and resistance in South East Asia.

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The Return of the Galon King: History, Law, and Rebellion in Colonial Burma


by Maitrii Aung–Thwin
Ohio University Press, 2010

In late 1930, on a secluded mountain overlooking the rural paddy fields of British Burma, a peasant leader named Saya San crowned himself King and inaugurated a series of uprisings that would later erupt into one of the largest anti-colonial rebellions in Southeast Asian history. Considered an imposter by the British, a hero by nationalists, and a prophet-king by area-studies specialists, Saya San came to embody traditional Southeast Asia’s encounter with European colonialism in his attempt to resurrect the lost throne of Burma.

The Return of the Galon King analyzes the legal origins of the Saya San story and reconsiders the facts upon which the basic narrative and interpretations of the rebellion are based. Aung-Thwin reveals how counter-insurgency law produced and criminalized Burmese culture, contributing to the way peasant resistance was recorded in the archives and understood by Southeast Asian scholars.

This interdisciplinary study reveals how colonial anthropologists, lawyers, and scholar-administrators produced interpretations of Burmese culture that influenced contemporary notions of Southeast Asian resistance and protest. It provides a fascinating case study of how history is treated by the law, how history emerges in legal decisions, and how the authority of the past is used to validate legal findings.

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