Bookshelf Spotlight: Southeast Asia & U.S. Relations/Investments

Featured University Of Hawai’i Press Publishing

* The Philippines and Japan in America’s Shadow

The Philippines and Japan in America’s Shadow


edited by Kiichi Fujiwara & Yoshiko Nagano
University Of Hawai’i Press, 2011

The authors in this volume examine the U.S. occupation of the Philippines and Japan from a wide range of perspectives (political science, history, anthropology, sociology, and literature). They suggest that American colonialism shows distinct characteristics of latecomer-colonialism, starting with the strong role of the state and the primacy of geopolitics. In contrast with other imperial powers, such as Britain, France, and Japan, the Americans relied more on informal empire than on direct control of territory, an approach that suited an era when colonialism as such was increasingly difficult to defend.

University Of Hawai’i Press | Goodreads | Amazon | Google Books

Featured Books

* Benevolent Assimilation: The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899-1903
* India-Burma (The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II)
* Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind
* No Sure Victory: Measuring U.S. Army Effectiveness and Progress in the Vietnam War
* Trade and Development in a Globalized World: The Unfair Trade Problem in U.S.D Thai Trade Relations

Benevolent Assimilation: The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899-1903


by Stuart Creighton Miller
Yale University Press, 1984

American acquisition of the Philippines and Filipino resistance to it became a focal point for debate on American imperialism. In a lively narrative, Miller tells the story of the war and how it challenged America’s sense of innocence. He examines the roles of key actors—the generals and presidents, the soldiers and senators—in America’s colonial adventure.

Yale University Press | Goodreads | Amazon | Google Books

Return to Top

India-Burma (The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II)


by David W. Hogan
Army Center of Military History, 1992

Goodreads | Amazon | Google Books

Return to Top

Lucky Child: A Daughter of Cambodia Reunites with the Sister She Left Behind


by Loung Ung
Harper Perennial, 2006

After enduring years of hunger, deprivation, and devastating loss at the hands of the Khmer Rouge, ten-year-old Loung Ung became the “lucky child,” the sibling chosen to accompany her eldest brother to America while her one surviving sister and two brothers remained behind. In this poignant and elegiac memoir, Loung recalls her assimilation into an unfamiliar new culture while struggling to overcome dogged memories of violence and the deep scars of war. In alternating chapters, she gives voice to Chou, the beloved older sister whose life in war-torn Cambodia so easily could have been hers. Highlighting the harsh realities of chance and circumstance in times of war as well as in times of peace, Lucky Child is ultimately a testament to the resilience of the human spirit and to the salvaging strength of family bonds.

Harper Perennial | Goodreads | Amazon | Google Books

Return to Top

No Sure Victory: Measuring U.S. Army Effectiveness and Progress in the Vietnam War


by Gregory A. Daddis
Oxford University Press, 2011

It is commonly thought that the U.S. Army in Vietnam, thrust into a war in which territory occupied was meaningless, depended on body counts as its sole measure of military progress. In No Sure Victory, Army officer and historian Gregory A. Daddis uncovers the truth behind this gross simplification of the historical record. Daddis shows that, confronted by an unfamiliar enemy and an even more unfamiliar form of warfare, the U.S. Army adopted a massive, and eventually unmanageable, system of measurements and formulas to track the progress of military operations that ranged from pacification efforts to search-and-destroy missions. Concentrating more on data collection and less on data analysis, these indiscriminate attempts to gauge success may actually have hindered the army’s ability to evaluate the true outcome of the fight at hand–a roadblock that Daddis believes significantly contributed to the multitude of failures that American forces in Vietnam faced. Filled with incisive analysis and rich historical detail, No Sure Victory is a valuable case study in unconventional warfare, a cautionary tale that offers important perspectives on how to measure performance in current and future armed conflict.

Oxford University Press | Goodreads | Amazon | Google Books

Return to Top

Trade and Development in a Globalized World: The Unfair Trade Problem in U.S.D Thai Trade Relations


by John M. Rothgeb Jr. and Benjamas Chinapandhu
Lexington Books, 2008

Trade and Development in a Globalized World examines how the unfair trade regulations of advanced countries affect developing societies. The most prominent of these regulations are those pertaining to dumping and subsidies. As antidumping and antisubsidy laws have proliferated, they have increasingly undermined the trade-related development strategies of poor countries. To determine how developing states attempt to cope with the problems created by unfair trade rules, Rothgeb and Chinapandhu conducted a case study of the Thai–U.S. trade relationship. The results, revealed here, show that unfair trade regulations have evolved substantially from their origins as devices for ensuring that international markets can not be manipulated to confer advantages upon selected exporters and that these regulations now serve as the primary protective mechanisms for guaranteeing that advanced country producers will not face competition from developing country industries.

Lexington Books | Goodreads | Amazon | Google Books

Return to Top

Pin It

Comments are closed.