Bookshelf Spotlight: Selections from Indiana University Press

Featured Books

* Colonialism and Nationalism in Asian Cinema
* Rice Talks: Food and Community in a Vietnamese Town
* Everyday Life in Southeast Asia
* Vietnam Protest Theatre: The Television War on Stage
* Women in Asia: Restoring Women to History
* Tragic Mountains: The Hmong, the Americans, and the Secret Wars for Laos, 1942-1992

Colonialism and Nationalism in Asian Cinema

by Wimal Dissanayake
Indiana University Press, 1994

As political barriers crumble, Asian cinema is increasingly attracting the attention of film critics, film scholars, and specialists in cultural studies. The relationship among cinema, nationhood, and history is as complex as it is fascinating, bringing us face to face with questions of power, ideology, truth, coloniality, post-coloniality, and representation. “Colonialism and Nationalism in Asian Cinema” deals with film traditions in nine Asian countries Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka and Australia. This book should be particularly relevant to Asianists, anthropologists, film scholars, students of cultural studies and historians.

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Rice Talks: Food and Community in a Vietnamese Town

by Nir Avieli
Indiana University Press, 2012

Rice Talks explores the importance of cooking and eating in the everyday social life of Hoi An, a properous market town in central Vietnam known for its exceptionally elaborate and sophisticated local cuisine. In a vivid and highly personal account, Nir Avieli takes the reader from the private setting of the extended family meal into the public realm of the festive, extraordinary, and unique. He shows how foodways relate to class relations, gender roles, religious practices, cosmology, ethnicity, and even local and national politics. This evocative study departs from conventional anthropological research on food by stressing the rich meanings, generative capacities, and potential subversion embedded in foodways and eating.

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Everyday Life in Southeast Asia

Edited by Kathleen M. Adams and Kathleen A. Gillogly
Indiana University Press, 2011

This lively survey of the peoples, cultures, and societies of Southeast Asia introduces a region of tremendous geographic, linguistic, historical, and religious diversity. Encompassing both mainland and insular countries, these engaging essays describe personhood and identity; family and household organization; nation-states; religion; popular culture and the arts; the legacies of war and recovery; globalization; and the environment. Throughout, the focus is on the daily lives and experiences of ordinary people. Most of the essays are original to this volume, while a few are widely taught classics. All were chosen for their timeliness and interest, and are ideally suited for the classroom.

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Vietnam Protest Theatre: The Television War on Stage

by Nora M. Alter
Indiana University Press, 1996

The escalation of the war in Vietnam in the mid-1960s unleashed worldwide protest. Playwrights grappled with the complexities of post-imperialist politics and with the problems of creating effective political theatre in the television age. The ephemeral theatre these writers created, today little-known and rarely studied, provides an important window on a complex moment in culture and history.

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Women in Asia: Restoring Women to History

by Barbara N. Ramusack and Sharon Sievers
Indiana University Press, 1999

Writing on southern and southeastern Asia, Barbara Ramusack surveys the prescriptive roles and lived experiences of women as well as the construction of gender from early states to the 1990s. Although both regions are home to the Hindu, Buddhist, and Muslim religious traditions and have extended trade relations, they reveal striking differences in the status and roles of women and the processes of cultural adaptation.

Sharon Sievers presents an overview of women’s participation in the histories of China, Japan, and Korea from prehistory to the modern period, providing a framework for incorporating women’s roles into world history courses. She offers analyses on major issues derived from recent research and discusses such stereotypical cultural practices as footbinding (long seen as “exotic” in the West) in the context of women’s lives.

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Tragic Mountains: The Hmong, the Americans, and the Secret Wars for Laos, 1942-1992

by Jane Hamilton-Merritt
Indiana University Press, 2008

Jane Hamilton-Merritt, Nobel-nominated scholar and photojournalist, has followed the plight of the Hmong and the war in Indochina since the 1960s. The staunchest of allies, the Hmong sided with the Americans against the North Vietnamese and were foot soldiers in the brutal secret war for Laos. Since the war, abandoned by their American allies, the Hmong have been subjected to a campaign of genocide by the North Vietnamese, including the use of chemical weapons. Tragic Mountains moves from the big picture of international diplomacy and power politics to the small villages and heroic engagements in the Lao jungle. It is a story of courage, brutality, heroism, betrayal, resilience, and hope.

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